Rotary Club of Homer-Kachemak Bay

 

 

Club Information

Welcome to the Rotary Club of Homer-Kachemak Bay - Celebrating Over 30 Years Serving Homer and Abroad

Homer-Kachemak Bay

Four Way Test: True, Fair, Goodwill & Beneficial to All

We meet Thursdays at 12:00 PM
Best Western Bidarka Inn
575 Sterling Hwy
PO Box 377
Homer, AK  99603
United States
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Home Page Stories

Here is the word from Dave on the Pavillion Open House.

 

Over the course of the 2-3 hours I would say we had 100 plus folks stop by.  The amount of food we went through would indicate perhaps more, 10 dozen oysters, 80 hotdogs, lots of shrimp and scallops, two watermelons,  and other picnic style goodies.  The good weather, the great music from the marimba band all added to the occasion.  The Kachemak Bay Rotary Club can be very proud of the role it played in making this community facility a reality.  I think we need to have a Rotary Social there someday soon, I’ll let you and Beth be in charge of the weather.

 

Thanks, 

Dave

 

 

 

Skydivers raise thousands for polio eradication

By

The first time Noel Jackson jumped out of a plane, it had nothing to do with raising money for polio eradication.

The Michigan dentist had received a gift certificate from members of his staff to go skydiving because they knew he was into adventure.

“It is definitely a defining moment,” says Jackson, a member of the Rotary Club of Trenton, Mich., of that first jump at 14,000 feet, done in tandem strapped to a professional skydiver. “The rush of the free fall is beyond anything I have ever experienced before. Just the speed and acceleration is unbelievable. You don’t even have time to figure out if you are enjoying it or not; it’s just a sensation that happens.”

Jackson did enjoy the sensation, so much so that he agreed to do another jump, with Shiva Koushik, a Rotarian friend in nearby Windsor, Ont. 

The two men were waiting for this second jump when their wives came up with the idea of enlisting other jumpers and raising pledges for polio eradication.

In August 2014, a jump in the skies of northeastern Michigan raised $15,000 for Rotary’s polio eradication campaign. Matched 2-to-1 by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the effort contributed $45,000 to the cause.

Since 1985, when Rotary committed to polio eradication, the organization has contributed more than $1.5 billion and countless volunteer hours to immunize children against the disease. In that time, the number of polio cases has dropped 99.9 percent, and only three countries remain where the virus has never been stopped: Afghanistan, Nigeria, and Pakistan. While World Polio Day, 24 October, serves as an important opportunity to remind the world of the need to finish the job, raising money and awareness is a year-round effort for many.

Late-night recruiting

Julie Caron, a member of the Rotary Club of Toronto Skyline, heard about plans for the Michigan fundraising skydive after being invited to speak at a leadership training event in Koushik’s district.

View Slideshow

Julie Caron and 10 members from Toronto Skyline and surrounding Rotary clubs plunged earthward in their own tandem skydive, raising several thousand dollars for polio eradication.   

 

“We were in one of those friendship rooms after the conference … when Koushik began talking about the skydive,” Caron says. “We all got really excited and signed up.

“I don’t like to back out on things I say I’m going to do, even if it’s the middle of the night,” Caron says. So she began raising money and drove down to Michigan to do the jump.

She also took the idea back to her own club, whose members are mostly young professionals looking for fun things to do. This past July, 10 members from Toronto Skyline and surrounding Rotary clubs plunged earthward in their own tandem skydive, raising several thousand dollars for polio eradication. 

Caron hopes to make it a yearly event.

“Polio eradication is definitely something I am passionate about,” she says. “It’s not a hard fundraiser to put together at all. You just call around and pick a place, and then you begin asking people if they would rather jump or pay up in pledges.”

Jackson, who’d jumped out of the plane in his “Captain Rotary” outfit, says he personally raised $4,700 for the Michigan skydive using Caron’s approach.

A recent jump in Michigan raised $45,000 to help end polio.

 

I would go up to people and tell them we were skydiving for polio and give them two options,” says Jackson. “I would tell them I was paying $180 out of my own pocket to jump, so if you are not going to jump, you have to pay $180. Most people would say, ‘OK, you got it.’ ”

Floating like a bird

Koushik and his wife are active in other ways to rid the world of polio. They have been on several trips with their Rotary district to immunize children in Afghanistan, Pakistan, and India, and particularly enjoy showing off their native country, India, from which they emigrated to Canada about 30 years ago. They are planning to take part in another National Immunization Day in Pakistan next year.

Still, the skydive will hold a special place in Koushik’s heart.

“This is one of the highlights of my polio eradication efforts,” he says. “It’s such a feeling of freedom. The first time out of the plane, you have very little idea what is happening; you are free-falling so fast. But once that parachute opens, you look around and say, ‘Wow!’ It’s such a great feeling to be able to float like a bird.”

 

Muslim and Christian women work together to prevent dengue fever in Indonesia

In a world where intolerance and violence fueled by religious differences are seemingly increasing, one Rotary club in Indonesia is showing how diversity can help prevent a pandemic threat.

When the Rotary Club of Solo Kartini in Surakarta, Indonesia, formed 25 years ago, its members drew criticism from the predominantly Muslim community.

The club’s members were mostly Christians, atypical for a country where more than 80 percent of the population is Muslim. Religious leaders were skeptical of Rotary’s secular mission and wary of intrusion.

Undeterred, the club started recruiting more members. Today, the 72-member, all-female club includes both Muslims and Christians. 

And the effort they have put into breaking down barriers and fostering respect and understanding among club members has reinforced the club’s capacity to address dengue fever, one of the biggest public health threats in tropical cities like Surakarta.

Dengue fever is a virus transmitted by mosquitos that flourish in tropical urban environments like Surakarta. There is no effective treatment; once infected, victims experience sudden high fevers, severe headaches, joint and muscle pain, fatigue, nausea, and vomiting.

Launching an effective public health initiative to prevent the disease requires volunteers with deep knowledge and connections to the community who can craft specific and sustainable solutions. And that means being able to build relationships across religious, cultural and socio-economic lines.  

The Rotary Club of Solo Kartini in Surakarta, Indonesia, installed white tiles on more than 3,500 tubs. The tiles make it easier to see and clean mosquito larvae, which helps prevent dengue fever.

Photos by Tim Deagle

Rotary member Mariam Kartonagoro says her club’s diverse makeup – particularly its abundance of mothers and professionals of varied ages and backgrounds – enhances their effort to fight dengue fever. “The fact that we are different does not create trouble, but it strengthens our relationship,” she says.

In collaboration with the Rotary Club of Westport, Connecticut, USA, and the local ministry of health in Surakarta, the Muslim and Christian club members have been able to help reduce the risk for dengue fever by interrupting the breeding cycles of carrier mosquitos. 

The first step was to implement a startlingly simple, low-cost strategy: line the dark cement bathtubs, common in Indonesian households, with white tiles so mosquito larvae is easier to see – and remove. In five years, the club project modified more than 3,500 tubs in two neighborhoods.

But tiles weren’t enough. The club needed to change habits and behaviors that contribute to infections, which required building trust to educate the community.

“Our main focus is to educate and invite people to be aware of health issues, hygiene, and the importance of a clean environment,” says Rotarian Indrijani Sutapa, one of the dengue project leads. “This takes a very long time to teach.” 

Community social workers teach homeowners how to empty and scrub infested tubs twice a week, close the lid on water containers, and bury waste that can collect water.

The fact that we are different does not create trouble, but it strengthens our relationship.


Rotary Club of Solo Kartini in Surakarta, Indonesia

Siti Wahyuningsih, Surakarta’s director of public health, hopes to extend Rotary’s white-tile project to other parts of the city. 

“Health is a shared responsibility between government, society, and the private sector,” she says. “The government can’t do it alone. We as a community must embrace all of our strengths, and Rotary is a big one.”

The club hopes to see more people crossing cultural lines to help each other.

“Rotary has a very diverse membership, and we can be examples to others in the way we work. After all, when we give help, we do not ask about the religion of the person whose tub we replace. We think in a much more global way,” says Rotarian Febri Dipokusumo. “And we try to foster relationships with people who may have different beliefs or thoughts. We can become friends here in Rotary. Maybe this way, we can inspire Indonesia and the world.”

View Slideshow

Rotary Club of Solo Kartini in Surakarta, Indonesia, formed 25 years ago. Today, the all-female club has 72 members and includes both Christians and Muslims.

Here is the latest on the Rotary Guns and Weapons Policy.

 

Begin forwarded message:

 

From: Laurie McCarthy <Laurie.McCarthy@rotary.org>

Subject: June Board policy clarification

Date: June 12, 2017 at 9:11:58 AM MDT

 

 

Dear Past Governors of District 5010,

 

On behalf of Rotary’s Board of Directors, thank you again for taking the time to express your concerns regarding our organization’s policy on Rotary club and district activities that involve guns and weapons.

 

The RI Board reviewed your and other members’ feedback at its June meeting this week and has decided to clarify this policy:

 

  • The policy allows clubs and districts to hold gun raffles and sponsor gun shows, as long as no club or district ever takes ownership of the weapons and all transfers of firearms are conducted by licensed third parties.

 

  • The policy does not prohibit sponsorship by companies that manufacture or sell guns.

 

The policy also provides guidance on the depiction of weapons with the Rotary Marks. Specifically, the Rotary Marks may not be shown along with images of guns or other weapons. The policy would not prohibit the incidental appearance of a gun or other weapon, for example, in a photo of a police officer being honored at a club function.

 

Thank you for being so engaged in this issue and telling Rotary how the policy has affected you and your club. Please do not hesitate to contact me with any questions.

 

Sincerely,

 

Laurie

.............................. .....

Laurie S. McCarthy

Director | Member Support

Tel 1.847.424.5289

rotary.org 

 

 

 

ROTARY INTERNATIONAL | One Rotary Center | 1560 Sherman Ave. | Evanston, IL 60201 USA

We announced last week that Will Files had won the Rotary Service Above Self Award and that only 150 people world wide receive the award annually, so it is a great honor for him to receive it.   

This is what the RI nomination form says about the award:

Rotary’s highest honor recognizes Rotarians who demonstrate Rotary’s motto, Service Above Self, by volunteering
their time and talents to help others. The award is internationally competitive and is granted to no more than 150
Rotarians worldwide, and no more than one from each district, each year.

 June 3rd, an Open House honoring Will was held at Clyde and Vivian's house. Following are some pictures taken at the Open House.

 

PDG Clyde, PDG Maynard, PDG Jane, and Will
Following a fun, windy, and wet picnic at Karen Hornaday Park, 22 Rotary Exchange Students were parceled out to various very enthused hosts to spend the night.  I can't say what happened at other houses, but we (Gayle and I) were absolutely delighted to host Ricco (Italy), Thomas (Belgium), and Gio (Brazil) for the night.  We were able to take a quick tour of Skyline Drive and East End Road and got out of the rain at our house.  After the obligatory "this is where you are staying" tour of our house, we got to sit down with popcorn and talk of the young men's experiences in Alaska, their homes, our experiences in Alaska, and all of the other fun things until we all started to fade. The next morning we feasted on waffles (Belgian waffles are not like Alaskan waffles!), and headed for town.  The normally 15 minute drive took 45 minutes due to road construction, but modern cell communication worked and Gio, Ricco, and Tom didn't get to stay in Homer--darn!  A stop at the Homer Chamber of Commerce for a few thousand pictures and a chance to meet Homer's Mayor Bryan Zak, and away they to Two Sister's for coffee and then north for more exploring. What a delightful bunch of young people!
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Speakers
Tom Early
Jun 29, 2017
Transfer the Gavel
Senator Lisa Murkowski
Jul 07, 2017
Legislative Update---Note: This is a DATE CHANGE--Meeting is on FRIDAY--NOT THURSDAY!
Vivian and Clyde
Jul 13, 2017
Rotary International Convention
Carly
Jul 20, 2017
Salmonfest
Erin Cline
Aug 03, 2017
"How Chinese Religions/Philosophies Have Influenced Chinese and East Asian Cultures."
Jan Knutson
Aug 10, 2017
Beth Trowbridge
Aug 17, 2017
Club Assembly
Derotha Ferraro
Aug 24, 2017
Rebound YE
Aug 31, 2017
Youth Exchange Experiences
 
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